In Search of A Method – View topic Trumpet Herald forum

Before finding out about Claude, using his books (and the many classic trumpet books he and his method assign) and eventually studying with him I was a typical player with embouchure trouble, endurance issues, and a range stuck around High C for years. Learning from Claude what to practice, how to practice and when to practice (and when to rest) allowed me to develop the ability to work as a full time professional trumpet player for more than 30 years.

It’s been said, but it really can’t be said enough: put your energy into finding a good, local teacher to take lessons from regularly. There is no book, method, internet forum, mouthpiece (Lord, the endless mouthpiece discussions ) that will get you to where you say you want to go faster, more efficiently — and it should be said, more enjoyably — than a good teacher.

I was in a similar situation as you a little over a year ago, looking for a teacher. I found a handful of the best players in town, sent them emails through their websites, and got various responses and recommendations that eventually lead me to the genius that is Chad McCullough. Over the past year, he’s given me approaches/exercises from Caruso, Stamp, Burns and others, filtered through his own deep experience (he studied with Vizzutti, among others) to essentially create a custom "method" that is best *for me*.

One more unsolicited piece of advice, but judging from the nature of your post, I’m guessing you are ripe for the endless/nonsensical mouthpiece shenanigans many of the folks on this forum are so found of. Save yourself the hassle and contact Chad through his website. He’s an AR Resonance rep. He’ll give you a free consultation, and send you some test rims and backbores so you can dial-in your setup (another Pro tip: when you test the pieces have someone around so you can not only judge by how it feels/plays but get some feedback from someone in the room on how you sound from the business end of the horn) … or, better yet, drive up to Chicago and make a day of it: hit the art museum, get a good meal, do the mouthpiece thing with Chad (he makes hella good coffee).

I did – Wow! Some serious chops right here in my home town. I went through the all of his youtube stuff as well. Maybe he’ll take on an old-timer like me. His views on the breathing very similar to videos from Wayne Bergeron & James Morrison. When I was a kid, they just said breathe through your diaphragm, which never resonated with me at the time.

It’s been said, but it really can’t be said enough: put your energy into finding a good, local teacher to take lessons from regularly. There is no book, method, internet forum, mouthpiece (Lord, the endless mouthpiece discussions ) that will get you to where you say you want to go faster, more efficiently — and it should be said, more enjoyably — than a good teacher.

I was in a similar situation as you a little over a year ago, looking for a teacher. I found a handful of the best players in town, sent them emails through their websites, and got various responses and recommendations that eventually lead me to the genius that is Chad McCullough. Over the past year, he’s given me approaches/exercises from Caruso, Stamp, Burns and others, filtered through his own deep experience (he studied with Vizzutti, among others) to essentially create a custom "method" that is best *for me*.

I have realized the most benefit from using the Greg Spence Mastery to Mystery series, helped with sound, embouchure and stamina. The other thing that helped immensely was using the Stamp method on a daily basis. I recently spent a week in Los Angeles with Malcolm McNab, and he is a big proponent of The Stamp Method. He claims it helped him be the success he is. Lastly find a couple of groups to play with, this will help with the motivation.

I have realized the most benefit from using the Greg Spence Mastery to Mystery series, helped with sound, embouchure and stamina. The other thing that helped immensely was using the Stamp method on a daily basis. I recently spent a week in Los Angeles with Malcolm McNab, and he is a big proponent of The Stamp Method. He claims it helped him be the success he is. Lastly find a couple of groups to play with, this will help with the motivation.

FYI – I used the name Don Manley a couple of times in this thread. It’s actually Jim Manley. Had first lesson with him and will be working on his approach, which is not the conventional method book. Once I get a few months out, I’ll be able to judge the results but I’ve bought in and excited. He’s a phenomenal player with enormous range. Very personable and really spends the time explaining basics of producing quality sound out of this crazy instrument. I see some guys on demonstrating range techniques and the notes sound like a mixture of spit and air. Jim’s are crystal clear with great musicality. So, its Jim Manley http://www.jimmanleymusic.com/